Home > Family, Judaism, Recipes > L’Shanah Tovah

L’Shanah Tovah

September 10th, 2010
Recipe for a sweet new year: Ten Apple Farm Apples and Finsom Farm honey from Brunswick, Maine
Recipe for a sweet new year: Ten Apple Farm apples and Finson Farm (kosher!) honey from South Berwick, Maine

It’s Rosh Hashanah and with Karl home, our new year is off to a sweet start! The girls and I made round raisin challah, we all picked apples, and Charlotte blew the shofar for the first time–and then suggested that we raise sheep so we can make our own! Last night, we hosted family and friends for a new year’s dinner on the farm, made mostly from ingredients we’d grown and raised.

The menu:

Raisin challah
Lift (pickled turnips)
Sauerkraut
Griebenes (confit of spent hen) with preserved lemon
Goldene yoikh (rich chicken soup) with kneydlakh (matzah balls)
Roast chicken
Potatoes cooked in schmaltz (chicken fat)
Tsimmes (with meat and without)
Roasted green beans
Steamed kale
Baked apples
Honey cake

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My favorite recipe for honey cake comes from the Bruce’s Bakery Cookbook, by Bruce Zipes. It’s very sweet, but is kept from being cloying by the addition of rye flour and orange zest. We serve it with baked apples.

Honey Cake

1 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup honey, preferably buckwheat or amber clover honey
1 1/2 tablespoons grated orange zest
1 1/2 cups rye flour
1 1/4 cups cake flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup orange juice
confectioners’ sugar, for dusting
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Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 12-cup bundt pan.
In a large mixing bowl, beat the oil, eggs, and sugar until blended. Gradually add the honey and orange zest and mix until blended. In another medium bowl, combine the rye flour, cake flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, allspice, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternately with the orange juice, beginning and ending with the flour mixture; beat until smooth.
Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 50 to 55 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool the cake completely on a wire rack.
To serve, dust with sifted confectioners’ sugar.
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posted by Family, Judaism, Recipes , ,

  1. September 10th, 2010 at 11:17 | #1

    Margaret – this was my favorite time of year in the Jewish faith – especially Sukkot and the sukkahs. I hope you have a sweet New Year. And I think Charlotte’s right – you all need some sheep! LOL – good job with Charlotte blowing the shofar – I could never do that. Take care, from KY.

  2. Brooke Travers
    September 10th, 2010 at 15:25 | #2

    I had a lot of fun seeing you in Maine. I will see you very soon at Sara’s Bat Miztvah!
    Love
    Brooke